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Full text of "The Quaker"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/quaker1931guil 



Ex 

LlBF^S 



h S Vas Jr. 



Copyright 
1931 



/ 



JAMES M. HARPER 

Editor 

IRVIN N. DAVIS 
'Business ^Manager 



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"X 



QUAKeK 



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of 



GUILFOEID COLLEGE 



[^ ON THE FRIENDLY ROAD 

'>-^\ IN GUILFORD COUNTY , 

V^i NORTH CAROLINA / , 



'(^"^^■ 



Published ^y The Student ^ody 



) ^ ■ ^ 





In this volume of the Quaker we hare at- 
tempted to preserve for future reference 
those things which have been most important 
m the activities for the year. In spite of its 
brevity, we feel that the events of major 
interest have been included and so we hope 
that readers will not condemn the book, for 
not being so large as some of the earlier 
predecessors. It is also true that, largely due 
to the financial support from the stu- 
dent budget, the Quaker is 
free from debt. 







9ne 

.CON'IKNTS 


'fills cADMlNlSTRATlON 


XV-'^ir: 11 

t^l^ CLASSES 

'i I" 

1^: cATHLETlCS 

1 ^■- : 


c : ORGANIZATIONS 


' FEATURES 



HaO 



( , V 






-') 



DEDICATION. 

because of her untiring efforts to se- 
cure for (^ nil ford better library facil- 
ities and since during the present year 
so many of these have been realized, 
we, the staff of the 1931 ^aker, take 
great pleasure in dedicating this, the 
eleventh volume of the 
^aker, to 

SMiss Katharine Q. ^icks 



'^t?^*"'^^ 



BOTawaKotaii-" 



A'^' 



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/V 






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^aSfSSSiZ^ iT^iiTiL 



Seniors 

Mattie McCanless 
Paul Tew 
Isabella Jlnkette 



Juniors 
Pearle Kimrev Jean Cockran 

WiLBERT Braxton Margaret Warner 

Marv E. Pirr.viAN 

Sophomores 
Maithevv Bridger Ethel Swaim 

Ruth Ida Hiller Marv Edith Camp 

David Parsons Virginia Hiatt 

Eleanor Bangs Rosei.and Nevvlin 

Marv Richardson 

Freshmen 
Esther Lee Cox Maude Hollowell 

Lerov Miller, Jr. Lewis Abel 

John Hugh Williams Thomas Houck 

RoscoE Barrow Martha Lane 

Clara Belle Welch Marianna Raiford 



" 




t 



ADMINISTRATION ^■ 



S^'V\r^ry;:)i':,f|^ 



SmS£SS£SSSiSSSSSSiiSiSiSSSS' 



jSSSnCiSiSiiSSjuSaCxiSM 



^he Qua\er, V^neteen thirty-one 





J. ]{l.\\0()» Cox, Clifur/iidii 
HIGH POINT, K. C. 



fl* 



Board of Trust©(es 

H. A. White High Point, N. C. 

I). R. I'arkhr High Point, N. C. 

Richard L. Hollowixl Greensboro, N. C. 

C. P. Frazier Greensboro, N. C. 

W. E. Blair Greensboro, N. C. 

Zeno H. Dixon Elkin, N. C. 

David White Greensboro, N. C. 

D. D. Carroli Chapel Hill, N. C. 

C. F. ToMLixsox High i'dint, N. C. 

Joseph D. Cox Higii Point, N. C. 

Pal L C. LIXDLE^• . Pomona, N. C. 



m>%^ 






^he Quaker, Mjneteen thirty-one 



& 



♦z^ 




Dr. Raimii\i> 1?ixi-i)R1), Fn\i,lini 



^he Qua\er, VXj^^teen thirty-one 



Faculty 



Lewis Lyndon Hobbs 



Prrsidiiit Eniiittus 



JamI'S Franklin Davis 

A.M.. llav.if..r.l CoIU-bc 

Proft'ssor of Grti'k and Hihliml l.ihtalui 



Elwood Chappell Perisho 

M.S., l'niv..r^it> ol clinafO; I.Ij.H.. E:irlll 

Professor of (lioloi/y anJ Dirtilor of 
Collcije Extensions 



.\L\i ij L. Gainev 

Triasurir of Ihc Collit/i- 



Helen T. Binford 

r^S.. K:iilliaiii I'lillii;.'. 
Inslnidiir in Moitrrn I.iini/iiiii/r 



J. WiLMHR PanCOAST 

B.S,, Swartlini.iii' i:'..11.-mi'. 
Professor of Malheinalics 




.L 



'^he Quaker, J^neteen 'thirty-one 



» 



^ 



r^ 



♦;% 




Faculty 



Emily R. Levfrixc 

MtiliHii of ^\■^v GarJni Hall 



Katharine C. Ricks 

A.H . Guilloid Culli-ge. 
Librarian 



X. Era Lasley 

A B.. cliiillni.l c-,,l|,.s.-. 

Registrar 



Eva G. Campbell 



I'rnfissor of Biology 



Samiel L. Haworth 

AM., Br.iUii I'Tiivc r.-iity. 
I'liififsor of Hihliiiil l.iliratur, unJ Riligioii 



Di)Riiin\ Lloyd Gilbert 

A.M., i.ulumliui Uliivtrsity. 
.hsodali- Priifrssor in English 



^he Qiia\er, VXjneteen thirty-one 



Facuky 



Dl.axk McCrackex 

I'li.n.. l-nivirsity ..1 Miim.-s..ta. 
I'rnfcssor nf Eioniimus and liiuiuiss 

Rertha '\l.\\ RnLL AxDRnws 

Graihiati' iil the Boston Normal Siliool ol G>ni 
iiaslirs. 

Dean of Ifom.n and Dinilor nf I'liysi.al 
Educalion far ll'omrn 



Philip \V. Furnas 

A.M-. Harvard University. 
Projcssnr of Enijlish 

E. Garxess Plrdom 

M.S., Uni\.r.-iil.v of CIiicaRO. 
/Issociatf Profissor of P/iysiis 




WiLLIA.M AIlLFORD LoFTOX 

I'li.L)., I'niv.Tsil.v of North I'arolina. 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ross Gilbert Frol nick 

A.M., Syracuse University. 
Associate Professor of Latin and Sfianish 







«• 



IS 



>L 



^he Qvia\er, J\[ineteen thirty-one 



c^ 



r^ 



♦i% 




icitilty 



Elizabeth Carhxk Bruce 

A.M.. i-,ilunil.ia rni\risil,v. 
tssoiiiilc Professor of Horn,- Einnomics 



Flo Osrorne 

Si u liar y to t/ir I'risiJiiit 



RIDI.RICK CaRLVLE SHLI'ARD 

\ .M . |-m\-. isil.v ,,l Nmi 111 I -III-., Una. 

Professor of Edn<alinn 



Euxa C. Haviland 

A.B,. Earlliain Coll. gu. 
Insiruitor in Ilislory 



Paul Reynolds 

f .\. 

InffiL/or inJiujlu 




OHX P. AXDIiRSON 

A.H., llillillix I'niht;.'. 

Direilor of Pliyshal Eduealioti for Men 



Cl^oe a. Milxer 

l;y» ,. Il;ii II..IJ1 Thrcl,, 
DeJf'ulJColle^^nd /,llesso/i).i/tl,losi/hy 




•dir 



'./ 



^he Qua\cr, V\[jneteen thirty-one 



Facmillty 



Ot*^ 



Ernestint- Cooksox Mii.nhr 

A.M.. W.'ll.'Hi.N (-..11. ■!;.'. 

Dirichir of I'.rsniiiiil ll'oik aiiA I'm iilinniil 
GuUarue 



M.\Riii Li isi: HuTH 

iKili- ..r llainbiiii; ri]i\.-r 

Insliuilor in Ciiiinan 



j.\iMrs L. Flhimixg 

Wakr l'-..|. .-it-. Stll.l.lll al rnivii-sily 

.Issoiiali- Prnjfssor in French 



Eliz.\ri;th O. Mi-:ixing 

Inslruiliir in Ihinif liiiinnniiis 



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A% 




J.^i 



4Al 



^he Qiialier, J^neteen thirty-one 



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Xn CDrmnrtam 



♦> 




Dr. iHarji iflrithruhall iSobbs 



'j^^T^v^rTi^sT-Tl^ ^L^u^^'^Z^^i 




">l\>:m 



THE CLASSES 



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Colors: J51ue and White 



Seeior Class 



Motto: Corpe Diem 



F lower: Sweet Pea 



Fall Term Officers 

Howard Caxnox President 

Graxvii.I.i; Ai.i.hv J'he-I'resident 

Lalra CuXRAI) Seeretary 

WelduN Reece Treasurer 

1 

Spring Term Officers 

Ernest Scarmord President 

Elkert Newi.ix J'iee-President 

Esther Lixdi ev Seeretury 

^VEI^ox Reece Treasurer 



■/4^ 



--^u-j 




Senior Class 



George Clayton Allen 

Candtdair for liir Diijicr of lliir/irlor of S<i,i:,r 

W. I,. S., 1. :;; TifHSuriT I'lass, 3; Footliall .Squad, 3: Sicntaiy .M.-iis Atlil.ti.- Coinnil. 3; 

So.ial Cumniittr.-. 3. 4; Studi-nt Affairs Board. 3. i. President. J; V. JI. r. A. Calnm t. 4; 

Photographic Manager "Quaker". 4. 

Doc is Guilford's Napoleon of the dining hall. His "cutious" hut firm work as head waiter 
has gained for him the re^pe^■t of the entire student hody. Last season he made a name for 
himself as the hardest hitting little man on the football squad. This year he holds one of 
the highest of student offices — President of the Student Affairs Board — and it has been 
largely through his efforts that the success of the student budget has been made possible; 
nor are his social and scholastic attainments overshadowed bv other successes. 



Verna Andrew 



Catululal,' for llir Drijrn of Harhrlor of Si'uncr 
■/.. I., .s.. 1. -1. ■:.. 4, Presiil. lit. 4; Home Er.innmi, s .\ssist.int. 

With \'erna it is "good will to men" at all seasons of the year, and not just at Christmas 
time. That come-hither look in her eyes, and that soft drawl in her voice have proved to 
be more than one Napoleon's Waterloo, though soineho\v these conquered heroes seem 
decidediv more pleased than vexed at their inevitable defeat. But \"erna has something 
more than all-cont|uering -miles; she claims her share of patience, diligence and mentality. 



U60~^-^ 




Senior Class 
James Granville Alley 

CanMal,- for llic Dnjro- "/ lUulirloy of S<in:, 



With his \vit and common sense Gran has made himself popular, not oidy \vith the mem- 
bers of his class, bnt with the faculty and student body as a whole. Nothing ever seems to 
upset his general demeanor, and his unobtrusive efforts make each new success seem to 
have come unsolicited. He captained CJuilford's be-t basketball team in recent years, and 
his unusual ^hots aided greatly in the ultimate success of the team, besides gaining for him 
the doubtfull> complimentar\ title of "freak." 



Ida Belle Clinard 

Candidalr for ihr Dr,,r,,- of li.u lulor of his 



Ida Belle to mans people is enveloped in a cloak of reserve, but to tho^e who have Ined 
with her and kno\v her, she will be remembered for her open-mindedness and thoughtful- 
ness. She also possesses spirited opiiuons, and these are frequently voiced. She is one of 
those who has had a taste of life bevond the college walls, for she had proven herself a 
successful teacher before she entered Guilford. During her t^rst two years, she attended 
Mars Hill, but the remaining years here have been suHicient to give her all the ear-marks of 
a true Guilfordian. 




S^' ■--^"_i ^_"f^E ^^3^ Q UAKi^ R 




Senior Class 



William Hale Alley 

CiuuiUal- far tlie Detjrrr of liiuhclor of Arts 

W. L. S.. :;. :: ; Tra. k Tram, 1. 2, :! 1: S.a rctarv JU-n's Athl.-tic Ccuniil. 4: Ero.i.mii.s Cluli :! : 
Student Affairs Board. 1. 

Long, lean, lone-^nme Bill I One of nature's noblemen, if there ever was one. Prohably Bill's 
greatest asset is his never-failing good humor. William is long-windeil both on the track 
and in the classroom. As you can well imagine, the wind is used for a good purpose on 
both occasions. The only sad part about Bill coining to Guilford was that his departure 
from tierinantown depopulated the village and busted the bank^. All joking a-icle, Bill, 
>ou have the highest regard of all your classmates, not only for your talents av a scholar 
and an athlete, but above all as a gentleman with a heart of pure gold. 



Edith Anne Cullipher 

ConJuUllr fnr llir I),i/r,-, nf liiulirlnr of \, ;,;;,, • 



■htirus. 1. 2, 



1, 2, 3; Soc 



Edith has furiii-hed 



rtainnient for N'ew Clardeii Hall for four \ears, and there 



will he a liig gap \\htii ^hc becomes one of Cniilford'" alumni. 
pur^uant of ■-cicnce, ^he ha- given much of her time to music; 
her on the athletic tielii or in the g> m to know that -he is o 
participants in such activities. 



Oul-ide of being a diligent 
anil one could not but see 
!ie of our most enthusiastic 



iXS-^:—^ 




Senior Class 



BUNYAN HaDLEY AnDREWS 

Candidat,- jor llir Dajr,-,- of lUululnr of Alls 



W L,. S., 1, 2; Track gquad, 1, 3, -t ; Play Cast. 1. :;. 4 

2, 3: Glee Cluh, 2. 3; A Caijella Choir. 2. 3. 4; Dramatii 

3' 4' Vice-President. 3. President, 4; Student Affair 

Board, 3; Willlani 



nan Scholarship, 3 



uncil. 2. 3, 4; Y. M. C, 
3; Debating Council. 3 
Chief Marshal, 3. 



Biiii\aii has ht-apcti activitv upiui ait'nity in liis tnni >ears lierc. The variety nf his 
interests make him luie of CHiilfnril's best-ronndecl students. He has played in five (if the 
productions of the Dramatic Council, taken a prominent part in musical organizations on 
the campus, and has been a track man. In spite of all these distracting influences his 
scholarship was high enough to \\\n for him the coveted honor of chief marshal in his 

junior year. 



Annie Laura Conrad 

Caiididat,- for ihr l),</r,;- of Htululor of Sciniir 

P. L. S.. 3, 1. Si-.Tetaiy, :;, I'r.-sid.-nt. 4: S.'rr.l;iry rlas.^. 4; .^^u,, n- Tram. 4. 

Try to imagine Laura as a very small girl again. Don't you think, for some reason, of a 
daintv little thing with spotless white dress, soft dark hair and narrow hands? A little girl 
who skips and runs about in spacious gardens under great magnolia trees, or in and out 
around the pillars of a colonial mansion veranda? A little girl pla>iiig under the affection- 
ate, but watchful eye of an old negro "mammy"? Somehow, Laura reminds us . . . 



(O-iTO 




Senior Class 



Marshall Hobart Barney 

Candidal,- fur llir Drr/r,;- of Ha, lu-lnr of .Iris 



r.vtr\niie sa\s that Bariir\ lia~ nne (if the best miiul- amnnt; the entire vtmlent hculv. He 
^houkl have; it's never been u^ed ' Hut then, \shy -.hnulcl he when he can do the same 
thiiiK with little etfnrt tliat nther^ work hour;, to complete? His chief outside activity is 
his wi>rk with the A Capella Choir. His voice is a notable addition to the first tenor 
section of thi^ musical nryani/ation. Were we choosing a collefjiate tvpe, "Miivh" would 



Argyle Elizabeth Elliott 

CaihliJal, for //„ D,-„rrr of lUuhrlor of Jrls 



■/,. I., s.. 1. 



Those soft, radiant eyes that give >ou the Lowe-down can mean only one thing — the water 

of Lethe which made her forget one man inspired her soul for another, ^>t fickleness in 

affaires de coeiir only strengthens her excellent ipialities. Patient, diligent and loving 

Argvie, we need more like \"ii. 



.._j r 



-y 



/ 




Senior Class 
Ottis Poe Barrow 

Ciriiliildlr fill lilt Dtijiii- of liculiclor of Scicm 



A transfer in liis m-cchuI xrar Kavc the Class nf '31 a valued recruit in Harniw. He has 
spent the succeeding \ears in doinj; the things which one is supposed tn do in college, 
namely, storing up knowledge atid acquiring a social background fcjr use in worldly con- 
(|ucsts. Those who jump at the conclusion that Barrow is another indolent Easterner 
have permitted themselves to be deceived by circumstantial evidence. Otis is an am- 
bitious tennis pla\er, Init his love games scored on the court fail to overshadow his games 
of love in courtships with Quaker co-eds. 



Georgia Savannah Fulk 

Candidal,- for llir Dnji,-,- nf lUulielor of .Iris 



t. 4 
3, 4 


Y. 

SfL 


W. C. A. I'al 


an Kn.l 


Tea 


n, 3 


; Volley Ball 


T.^alli, 



Ceorgia was born with a nature essentially sociable. She likes all types of people and has 

a penchant for amiexing new accjuaintances by the half dozen. She's always convivial and 

ready to show herself friendly. Her smiles are of the sunny "ever-ready" brand, and her 

accents soft and low. Georgia's all right, all right! 



A- 



Cj{}Cj 



•a^: 



:^'--i. 



^^~- 




Senior Class 



Samuel Alfred Boose 

CanJidale for the D,-i/r,;- of lUiilirhr of Siiriur 

H. C. L. S., 1. i. ■:.. I; i-Liss l'n-snl.-iU, !■ ; l/'lioius. 1, 2. :'. ; A I'liiulla i/hnir. H; Gl.-e Club. 3; 
Sui.riii)l,.Ti.Uiil t;unday Sclioul, 2; Y. 11. C. A. Caliin..-t. 2, 3. 

In his quiet and nnassuminp; manner, Boose has gone abnnt his uork here at Guilford in a 
way that has marked him for future success. Just as a single swallow doesn't make a 
summer, neither does one rhicken make a trick. Sam has ever been a favorite with 
Quaker maids, and so it ^eerns a mockery of fate that he has lost his heart to a girl outside 
of the college. His popularitv gained for him the presidency of his cla-s during his 
sophomore year here. 



Leona Mae Guthrie 

Candidal,- for the Dcqrc,- of Hadidor of Srinir 



P. L. S.. 1. 3- 4 Shi'IV 

3; Women's Athli-tl.- i 

3. 4: Ba.skc.tball. 1. 2. 

Cliampionship. 1. 



unieii-s Stuclcnt Cou 
3, 4 ; Hockey Team, 
■■ball. 1. 2. 3. 4; Ter 
y Cbampionship. 3: 



If some girl is needed for a nian-^ized joli, they call nii Leona, in whom masculine strength 
and feminine agilit\ combine tit form <^ine of the finest girN in the Senior (^iass. Her broad 
mind and impartial judgment make her capable of discharging efHciently her position as 
President of the WomeTi's Stuilent CJovernment. Despite these facts, she is shrouded in the 
mystery of those frequent week-ends off campus. Leona's originality is an open sesame 
to an> place. She's an all-round sport and a real girl. 






-z:-:^-^ 



--^-^6-- 




It seems a bit strange to the boys who recall their freshman year that Cannon, who was 
then a terror in the Sophomore Class should be destined to graduate with this sorely 
abused group. He stayed out of school for a year, and came hack to become one of the 
outstanding members of the class. There seems to be (juite a difference between football 
and dramatics, but "Popgun" is a star at both. In his quiet but powerful way he takes 
his classes with little effort and great success, and members of the opposite sex in much the 
same inarnier. 



Gertrude Ina Hinshaw 



CiiiJidalr for lit, D,cji,r uj Ihululor oj Scinu 



Ciert is a girl who makes an art of being a friend. Her cheerful, sympathetic interest in 
everyone with whom she comes in contact wins for her a warm place in their affections. 
She has put in innre than the usual time preparing her class work, but never has she 
degenerated to the point of being a book worm. Her chief interest is centeretl in her 
work of Home pA'ononiics and with lur natural gifts and stick-to-it-tiveness, she will surely 

be a success. 



?-R 



^^^/Si^^:^ n THE 1931 QUAKER [j^^^^JiJ 




Senior Class 
Thomas Jackson Cheek 

CiUhliJiil,- fur til, Dc(jrc,- nj liaihrlur of .Ills 

W. L. S.. 1. 2; |-M()tb^ill T. am. 1, :;, :'.. I. Alti-riiatt Captain. A; Basketball SquaJ. 1. 2: Basket- 
ball Team. :;, 4. l;as.l,:ill T.aTti. 1. J, 3, 4, Captain. 3; MonLi.sram Club; VK'e-I'ii-sident Men's 
Athletic A.-i.-<".iaii..n. :; . .M.-ns Stu.l.nt Council, 3, 4, President. 4; ■'Guillorilian" Boafd. 3; 
■Quakei- Board. 4. 

When it ciiiiir- tu tluini; inn^t aiivthiiif,' lictter than iiin-t anycine cNe can tin It, Iciii lias no 
equal hcrcalicuit^. He has ^coreil a ^weepiiiK victory over the Held of athletic accoinplish- 
ments h\ becoming a three-sports star. To leave the matter here, however, ^vollld not be 
fair to his other successes. He has proved himself quite a reformer in his ofHce as President 
of the Men's Student Council; it is also true that under the stress of immediately impending 
examinations, he brings into pla\ a marvelous intellect and aiKU scholarship to his list 

of laurels, 

Mary Esther Hollowell 

CiiiiJhIiih for tlir Drtjrre nj Utulnliir of Arts 



A charming ctuitribution of the college communit\' to the Class of '31. Because she is one 
of those rare human beings \\\\a is able to do big things with little commotion, she has 
pla>ed the role of a bashfid Quaker maiden during her four years here. Music has claimed 
much of her attention and in after vears it mav well be a source of pride to her to know- 
that she contribined in no sni.ill \\a\ to the early success ,,t the choir and chorus. 



ouaklr 



-( J-'^A 



-=^^=$ g g^=^--^---^-^g--v - 




Senior Class 

James Madison Harper 

Candidal,- jor Ih,- Deijrcr of Bathrlnr of .his 

Seiietaiy. 2; Pn-sident class. 1; <;ie.> (.'lul.. :: ; 
2. 3: Sports Editor, 1. Edil 



Dynamite comes in small boxes and such is the manner in -which Jimmie encases his ca- 
pacities, mental and physical. Jimmie has succeeded exceptionallx well in every line of 
endeavor that he has attempted from the varied field of journalism to the art of driving 
Hudsons. He has been the Grantland Rice and Ileywond Broun of all of Guilford's 
journalistic efforts. Not only a news sleuth, par excellence, James has shown a great ver- 
satility in athletics, politics and studies since his advent into our Tnivcrsity nf Brotherly 
Love and Sisterly Affection. This much for James — if he succeeds as well in life as he 
has in college, one more name will be entered in the liall of Fame. 



Isabella Jinnette 

Candidal,- for llic Degree of Baclielor of Arts 

Z. L. S., 1, 2. ?., J. I'lisidpnt, 4; Glup Club. 1; Community Chorus. 4; Treasurt-r Y. W. r 
:l; yvnm..n'.s StudiiU c.ulK-il. 2. 3. Secretary, 3; Sft-rt'tary Y. W. C. A.. 3; Y. W. I '. A. < 
m.-t. ::. 4; Colli-Kr Waishal. 3; Honor.s. 2; Honor Roll. 3. 4; Cla.ss Mar.slial. 4; Bast-ball T.ai 
Volley Ball Team, 3. 4; Soceer Team, 4; Winner Archery Tournament. 2- 

Izzy is another exemplar of the petite, but powerful. She has been dominated by the 
that anything worth doing is worth doing well, and true to form, she has conscientii 
applied this theory to her college life. As a librarian she is charming and business- 
as an athlete, she plays the game; and as a student, she makes the grades. Best of 
to vou, Isabella! 



uislv 
like; 
luck 



THE 1931 QUAKER 



Si .".T^t- T '. 




Seinaor Class 



CiRGUs Ivan Jackson 

Ciuuiuicil, ji,r till- Digra of Ita, /i,l„i uf I its 



It ^rems tn lu- ;iii nld pr.ivi-rl. tluit tnoilxill anil Miidirs dnn't i; . to;;,tlui, hut l\nn luckMin 
took nnly t(pur \rai-v t.i .liv|inivc this thenr>. C'oupird with his tak-nts which he iltrived 
from iiatiirt-, "Stoiiey" has an abundant amount (if dcterminaticm, ciiuranc and energv. 
Equally fearless on a hlood-soaked gridiron and a nerve-wracking Economics Class, he is 
indeed a paragon. An All-Conference Cniard one year and a hroken leg the next are the 
trophies that Jackson will take to \'alhalla from the field ot athlcli.' indi-.u .n, while from 
the laliorious classroom, "Stoney" has garnered a midtiiiulc ol As .md lis. Cheerio, 
Jackson, and inay your efforts be as well remembered in life's reci>rd liook as thc\ are bv 
\oiir classmates. 



Esther Annie Lindley 



CiuiJiJiil, for III,- I),, 



1,. Ii 



of lia,li,tor „j Iris 



: Clans 
Team. 



Another one of New (larden's potent products is rec'ogni/ed in INthcr. Her animation, 
charm and exec iiti\ e aliility liroiight her to the forefront in tlie early part of her college 
life, and culnii)iated in high extra-curricula honors in her senior year. She has excelled in 
sports, and, though she has been "rushed" her last year, she h.is always managed to budget 
her time so that the social hour did not suffer. 



/■ ■• ^'5 - ! THE 1931 QUAKER ^ ^(:>^ 



— ^-Dljcr-' 



^^ ^ - 



..^^ 



^ 




Senior Class 
Murray Johnson 

CandiJaIr jar ///,■ Dnmr of Ha< lirlor of Arts 

It's a man-sized jcib to he a K""<' preacher; it's a nian-sized jiih tii no to sihniil ami make 
all A's; hut it's mighty near a miracle to discover a person %vho can do both. Yet, this is 
the consistent accomplishment of Reverend Johnson. He is one preacher who docs not bear 
his professional dit;nit\ into the classroom, and liis open-mindedness on all subjects has 
made him both popular and respected b\ niemliers of the facult\ and students. Success 
will have to «et shiftv to elude thi^ man who doe^ everwhinn vi, xvell. 

Ollie Victoria McBane 

Caiutidal,- far llir D,i/r,-r af Ha, lirlar of Sciriur 
I'. I., s., 1, :;. :;, t : H^.rk,.> t.nuh. 1. :;, ;;. 

The c|uiet manner in which Ollie has j^one about her daily work has kept a large number 
of the students from having an ample opportunity to recognize the real value of our 
class. But to those who are of her inner circle she stands out as one of the most cherished 
friends added in their four years at Ciuilford. The fact that she lives off campus has 
prevented her taking part in man\ student activities, but for three years she was an 
outstanding pla>er ot the class hockev team. 



^^(^-/- ^ THE 1931 QUAKER ~gf|:^V^g^, 





John P. Lippincott 

CamUJiil, fnr ilir Dri/irr of Biuliclor of .Iris 



The man withmit a iniililk- name! An air of mystery and intrigue Mirnnind^ the initial 
"P" nt our bcloveci "Frau," ami nothing will ever extract it from him hut the rack and 
thumb-screws. Even though he ^von't tell us his middle name, we forgive "Frau" because 
of the enviable record he made on the football field and as the Major Hoople of the lecture 
room. Combined with a marvelous personality, "Lip" has a dynamic character and has 
been aptly called the "fightin'est little man" that ever represented Cniilford on the gridiron. 
Above all, "Lip" has an excellent intellect that, ^ve hope, will carry him safely through 
all of life's \ici^situdeN .ind tribulations. "Frau" has aspirations of becoming another 
Chncnie Parrow and we sincereU \\ i^h him luck. 



Mattie McCanless 

CanJiJdIr for t/ir D,-,/r,;- nf llai/irhir nf .Iris 

P. I,. S.. 1. :■. :;. I; S. . . , r T. :iiii l; Y. \V. I'. ,X. iVil.ni.t; lli.n.ii F;,.n. U 

To say that Mattie is a French major is not sufficient; she's simpl> a wizard at it! Nor 
does her success and fondness for the language end with the subject matter — it is carried 
through the entire department. She used to harbor another dark secret, too, but that's 
out now. Nevertheless, Mattie was a good sport and stood invulnerable to all the brickbats 
and bouquets which were showered upon her. Besides having these manly occupations, 
Mattie is a fine student, winning for herself a high place among the intelligencia. 



34 



1 QUAKER 




Senior Class 
Elbert Dewey Newlin 

Caiutidair fur llir l),;ii,,- nj lla, lulor «/ J lis 



Precuhcr Newlin lKl^ won tin- ndmiratioii (it caih iiiemhcr nl lii^ class In his patient, 
cnnscieiitious eiTiirt. All tliri.unh liis >ears here at C.iiilforil, he has bdine the respcmsibility 
of being the head of a family, acting as pastor of a regular church, and besides, main- 
taining a high standard of scholarship. No more significant move could have been taken 
bv the other members of the Class of '51 than their unanimous decision to make him vice- 
president of his class in his final \car at (.oiilford. 



Louise Melville 

Candidal,- for ihr Dcjre- uf ISa,/iilor 0/ Siirii, 



P. L. S.. 1. 2. 8. 


4, Si'cretary. 3 Pi c.si.l.-nt, 4; V. W. 


'. A. 


L'abiuel. 


. 2; Social Con 


imittee, 2 


Chairman Social 


Committee, 3; State Y. W. C. A.. Pr 


esiden' 


. 4: Stuii 


ent Affairs Boa 


■tl. 2, 3, 4 


Class Secretary. 


I; Glee Club, 1. 2. 3; Community 


•horus 


. 1. 2. 3 


4: A Capella 


Choir. 2 


Women's .\thleti. 


Cabinet. 3, 4: Archery Manaser. 2; 


Voll.'\ 


Ball Ma 


laser. 4: Tra.k 


Squad. 1 


Basi'ball T.am. 1 


2. 3, 4: Ba.sketball Team. 1, 2. 3 


1; Ho 


rk.y Tea 


in. 2. 3: .Sonei 


Team. 4 


.\i. 1 


.•IV 1 ■liampion.'ihii). 1; Volley r.iill T, 


nil 2. 


:;. 4; ,M,, 


loKiani Club. 





The above list makes manifest Louise's acconiplis 
undertaken she has discharged in her i h: 



at Cluiltord. Each task she has 
sticalh ctticicnt m.inner. 






3S^-^:^^^^JXj^L}llL^ 





Senior Class 



John Morton Phillips 

CiiiJiJiilr for llir D,',jrcr of Biulirlnr of his 

w. I., s ■:. ::. K.Mn..mi,s .-lui.. 2. :: : Tiari; Ti-am. 1. J, ;:. t. 

Here iv a hoy whci ha^ Oriental iileas about mi^^ing clavves. SiTice he has heeti at Caiiltord 
he has never niisseil a recitation period except tor an athletic trip. A> a result, he has 
established himself as one of the best students in the class. For three seasons he has 
starred as a track man, and if he removes obstacles out in the world with the same easv 
stride that enables him to "bust" tape in track meets, he is destined for success. 



Willie Grace Ransdell 

CaiiJutuIr for ihc Dcijrer of Biuliclor of Arts 



Brown curK. dark blue exes and flashing teeth? That'^ Cirace' But there's lots more 

than that to tell about in describing her. A "sweet girl graduate" she'll make, we know, 

but somehow we'd prefer to keep her with us a while \ et. \ <h\ see, \\ e like Cirace a lot, 

and long after ^he's gone "the melody will linger on." 



">UAKZR 




Senior Class 
Weldon Edgar Reece 

CamiuUUr fur the D,;jin nf lUuliclnr nf Siirni 



Fontliall T.'iim, \. 2. .T: As 






(irnial, joking Ri il i- nhva\s in a uoi.d huiinu— rxcipt \\hcii In- is phniiisi a hard Kaiiu- 
of to,,thall— and c\ii on thr aKil to add anotlu-i vtai to his ^oldtn crown. Math has been' 
his major, but nurses and hospitals are his hililu. Two \ears as a niainstay on the 
Quaker football team and three as baseball ( low n mark his athUtir attainments. With 
his personality and uncanny business ability, his luturr sue cess in the \vorld at large seems 
a foregone conclusion. 



Mary Alice Reynolds 

Cundulalc jur the Diijrer of Baihclnr of Siiciur 

Sc'.r,.tiav. :!. rirslilrnt 4; .Sf.Ti'taiv class. 1: W.niicirs Slii.lnil i ■(.iiiicil, 
ihin.'t. :;, :;. I, \-ir. -President. 4; Si>chit i ■,>Tnniil trr. ::. -I: Stiuleiil .MTairs 
l>ii\- lihis. 4: SuiHTlntendent Sunday S.l 1. :'. ; liirr rliil. 1. :;. :■. ; Vic- 

1; .\ Caiiella cluiir, -1. 4; Women'.s Athl.tii , ■;, l,i,i,.i . :; i: .Manaii.r T^iuiis. 

I; Hoi-ltev Team, ?. ; Soccer Team 4; li.isk.ll •r..;in,. :;, 4. Vnn.-y l;.ill 

T.ain, :l, 4; B.is.lian Team, 1, 2, i; ILni"-.;! :uii 'lui,. 



I'. I>. S.. 1. 2. :!, 
2, 4; Y. \V. C. .y. 
Board, 2; IT.-.sidei 
President Glir i In 
3; Manager ll.nk. 



Mar> has cstalilishcd hersdl as a model ot etficicnci. Ilcr reputation has gained for her 

inan\ stuilcnt honors which call for hard work and ^ood iud^mciu. She has taken a 

prominent part in sponsorinj^ Christian activities on the campus, especialh' the collet;e 

Suiidav School. 



^~ 



/.-"Z\ U 



'7.-' 



^::-^m 



6'-^ 




Senior jCJa^ 
Glenn Marion Robertson 

CaiufulaU- for the Dc/nr nj lUulidor of S<i,n, ,■ 

W. I. s.. 1. :'. ?.. I. S.'.rc-t:uv, 2. Prrsl.li-nt. .1; Y. M. i '. A. '-Lil.in.t. J. :;. I. Se.r,-i in \'. :! ; s..,kiI 

(•"iiiniill.-.-, 1. J. :; 1; Mrii's Slu.l.-iu i-niiii.il l;; stud. ■lit AITiiirs Boaiil, ?.. -I; Ii.-li;ithit; foun.il. 

2, 3. .1. I'l-.'si.l.-iil, 4; Gil-.- c'hil., 1. 2 :;. Vi.-.'-Pn'.siil.-iit. U, rresidi-nt. ;l ; i ■nmnmiiit v i'h..i-u.s, 1. 

2. :;. I: A I'al'.-Hii l'h..]r, 2. 2.. 4; Quart. -ttt-. ?,. -1. 

Cjlenn'> K"ldf" viilie has enabled him to win a permanent place in the memory nf the mem- 
bers of his class. His good humor and friendliness have made him popular with the boys, 
as well as the girls. His music has been his ruling passion and he has done it well. As 
president and student .lirector, he ^vas the feature of the Minnesingers, and even so versatile 
an organization as the .'\ Capella Choir would be lost without his service. His success 
must of nccessit\ come within the realm of art, for invariably his business deals result in 
bargains for his ad\ersaries. 

Merlie Hazel Sizemore 

CanJidal, for llir Dr,/r,; »/ IScu/irlur i,j Siiiiur 



Often one looks up and notices a deinure little lassie tripping along, looking neither to the 
right, nor to the left — unless soine of the table-waiters have purloined some "wuxtras" — as if 
there were some goal ahead that she, with unswerving purpose, must reach. Quiet, reserved, 
by nattire geiule and wise, Merlie is destined to attain that highest of honor- — true woman- 
hood. Merlie iloesn't need to sing her own praises, for her daily life is a sweet song in 
itself, and her face the clear echo of the song. 



— ^^^ns--^-^- 





Senior Class 
Lewis Rosenfelt 

CaiuUdatr Inr tlir Dnjr,-,- nf lUuluhir of Alls 



Rosenfelt has been at Ciuilfurd just this year and hU thirst tdr knnwleilne has prevented 
anv verv numennis social contacts. The thorout;hne^s witli which he does hi^ work has 
gained for him the respect of both professors and classmates. His chief hohh\ is writing 
news articles that are different. His range of subject-matter and his varie.I ^tyle of treat- 
ment has won for him the title of Gnilford's Poe. 



p. L. .?.. 1, :;, 



Katie Pearl Stuckey 

Candidali inr llic D,yr,r nf Hailiilnr of Arts 



.?. President, 4: Wo 



Sophistication and poise and a hearing befitting the high dignitx of her seniority ' Bnt not 
all of the time. Even a senior must be forgiven aii occasional lapse — a failure, now and 
again, to employ her lorgnette. Sometimes even Katie forgets and goes merrily skipping 
along the path, her infections laughter trailing like a gayly-colored scarf behind her on 
the breeze. And have you ever seeii her smile? Oh! but you must! It's charming — 
irresistible — that's what it is! 





Ernest Marshall Scarboro 

CandUalf for llir Dn/rrr of liaditlor of .Iris 



I- 1(1111 the tirsl chiss imrliiiu in thr tic^hiiian \t\ir up to the vtiv last Scaibciro has ever 
been in the limelight (if the C'his- ot '^i. Draniatio have clairiietl much of his attention. 
Although he has starred in lour pKuliK tions, his influence as a member of the council has 
been even more far-reaching. Al-o, it was during his regime as editor that the (aiilfnrdian 
came to the front as (ine of the best ever published. A Htting climax to his suc(essful 
career is his selection as Senior Class president. 



!■. 1.. .s; . 


. 1!. :!, -1; '-(i 


t,.;mo, :;, : 


: .sn,,...e T.a, 


"The app 
duties ku( 
uell knov 


c (.1 her ex. 
un K. all se 
n K. both 1 



Edna Louise Wafford 

C.aiidiJal, tor thr Drarrr of lUulirlor of Jrls 



is still Idna's most pi.iinineut thoiiglu in ^phv ol the dignin and 
irs. Her alulil\ in atlilelic uork and lur '■do as I please air" are 
s and girls. She is a good friend and ahvaxs stands ready to 
i( (' her opinion for what she thinks is right. 




-■ f:> 



^. 



Senior Class 



Allen Hale Stafford 






r.anduUii,- I'm tlir D,,ii,, „l lUu li,l„r of Arts 



% 



When, at ^oInl:■ hit 

have made the graile in th 



il thf C'la^ 
ria, Statfurd'; 



livt ha- 



cnmpilrd ..I Ihn.f uh:l 
piiiiiiu^l\ near the top. 
imld-be 



He possesses a patience and self-control which makes him master of all his 
tormentors. Athletics have claimed much of his attention and in these, as in other things, 
he has siven his best for the good of the common cause. His masterv of the field of history 
is an enviable culmination of diligent and well-directed scholastic cff.irt. 



Paul Douglass Tew 

CanduUitr far ihc Dnjr,, »/ ll,i,/„lnr of .his 



Four >ears of patient and conscienli.Miv service has tliis youth dedicated to the jireat Rod 
of scholarship. Few arc the things \\hich DoutJ has ever permitted to come between him 
and his first love. For three vears he sang with the Minnesingers, hut when they passed 
from existence, so did his extra-curricula activities. Nor has this quest for knowledge been 
in vain .\s the >ear draws to a close, his name is readv to be engraved upon Guilford's 
scholastic roll of honor. 



-^v^^-i^'fe 



.L 






^he Qualier, J\[jneteen thirty-one 



Xn CDrutnriam 



♦> 




lElmitta S'ilsr 

1930 



'^he QnaJicr, V\[jneteen thirty-one 



Jmeior Class 




(Jolfjrs: Red and White Floicrr; Red Rose 

I\Iott(j: Too low thev bLiild who build beneath the stars. 



Fall Term Officers 

Allhn White President 

Dorothy- Wolff J'icc-Pnsidtiit 

I.MOGENF StRICKI.AXI) Sccrctlliy 

■f 

Spring Term Officers 

RoHFRT WlLDMAN President 

Davtox Xfwlix I'iee-President 

Joseph LXH Ki.\ire\- Seentwy 



fl* 



^he Quaker, J\ljneteen 'thirty-one 




Wilbfit'v M prctt\ };nn(l vkatf In spite of his 
As — his prott-ssiirs just liini't iiiulerstaiul him. 



She h.is i;^ps^^ c\es nini a n> ps\ 's heart, but 
an essentiall\ "French (?) iiuthnik" nii life! 



It's a pu^/le hiuv ime man eaii iln sci man\ 
thin-s let il,. ihem a- well as ■■Reveren.l" iloes. 



Jhsse C Carson, Jr. 

His niekname mav be "Kit," but he's a lot like 
"(;ar\ Cni.peh, suh '" 



Soi'HiA Cfxii.it Cathia' 

Sophi.rs ynlileii ili^iiiti anil si-ntinient arc tirmh 
lui tas.inatlon tnr 11. .me l-omomies. 



I I l.nm R'l I 'ill, \Kli CmsilOI.M 



It .nul \\hen Tip ui-niluates, xv e su^^est the De 
,i;ree t.ir Kaehelnr of Smarts. 



^he QuaJier^ ^TXJneteen thirty-one 



^'■' 



Jl 



4m 

Ira Sheppard Cholerton 




Deacon finds Quaker co-eds of the South quite 
as delectable as those of the Middle West. 



Lucv Virginia Clayton; 

She has the face of a madonna aXd il; 
a Griselda. 4 J^fL 

Ada Ann Ci.ixard 

I'rom Salem t'olle^e came a little gray mouse t" 
pursue her UTiolitrusive way. 



Jean Uoroth\' Cockrax 

Happy Jean follows the slighty trodden path to 
success of superior ability and friendliness. 



Alice Conrad 

None compares with Alice for smiling etticienc 
and graciousness of maimer. 



Eugene Octaviols Eagle 

Steady-going and peaceable describe Cicne fairly 
well, but poised and mature describe him better. 



Sarah Elizabeth Edgerton 

Lib takes her own good time, but she gets there 
just the same. 



Austin Garner 

A silver-tongued Irish orator with no conscience 
other than a big, warm heart. 



Eleanor Shields Grimslev 

She plays a little; she draws a lot; but her 

major's wi cuii 'i pu. i OHI T t e.^^^^^^^^i^ 

Edna Rodena Guthrie 

Edna's junior year has been oiie stumbling block 
after another — namelv, American History. 





^ ^ ^^-^ji^^^^^^'^''^ 



a1 Ji- )K y^ y ^^2 QuaJier, J\[jneteen 'thirty-one 




Jueior Class 



Grace Elizabeth Hassell 

I his miniature has twu great worries — "B"man 
and •■\"' programs. 



De\vh\ Fraxklix Hkxdrix 

Shorty's hjng on personality and wide as regards 
his circle of friends. 



El\ix HiR.MAx Haworth 

\n all-round good athlete who dominates hi' 
sport, but is not dominated liy it. 



Mabei. Xicholsox Holtox 

Malnl is <|uick to offer assistance when it is 
needed, and hospitality when it is most \velcome. 



Robert Hashford Jamiesox 



Xo greater hope could he realized than a kid 
brother modeled after Boh. .An ideal ? Well, ves. 



JOSEI'HIXE KI^IRE^• 

Jo, girl of the nimble fingers, bids fair for fame 
via the keyboard. 



PkaRI.E KlMREV 

Blonde, bUie-eyed Pearle exhibits unusual >Jifll 
in managing money matters. 

AMES Marvix Lixdlev 

Mar\ in's vocal chords can do tricks and don't 
yon forget it. 

John .Norwood Love 

lootiiall heroes are alwa\s in vogue; and so is 
love. 

Elizabeth Delores McVey 

Distinguished Elizabeth is one of the seven won- 
ders of the world — she's an American History 
shark. 



V \ 



^he QuaJ^Tf U\(jneteen thirty-one 



«■ 



f •., ^ 



1 ^' 



Charles Hroimi; Money 

Hiv idea iif heavenly juy lias liL-en ohanned fn.m 
^;ate> nf pearl t(i ilate> with IVarle. 

Elizabeth Graham Parkir 

She has vim, vi^or aiu] vitality, and she doesn't 
take them all iiiit nn the t>pewriter either. 



JLLLA AlLEKX PeGG 



An elective idiirse in t'hildren's Literature, and 

lre(|uent alUisicins to tin\ tuts, make Aileen'^ 

amhition clear. 



Jesse Amos Phh.lips 

Who kn.iws the pndound tliuughts which art 
harbored in his mind ? 



Wn.LLAM Arrell Pierce 

Peach pie is rather tii he chosen than ut'eal 
riches, hut his heart is engraved "In gold." 



Marv Elizabeth Pittman 

The helping hand is accused of coinplicit> in the 
unlimeh death of numerous white mice. 



^^.^-r'*^^ JlLIA M. Pn MMER 

. D j^ .\ thorouglih modern young thing with a rea 

^•' ^y^ personalit\ and a sturdv philosophv. 

y^ Q^ Holland Hubert Shields 

He minds liis own business; appears friendl 
and is so. 

Blanche Silver 

That rarest of all phenomena — a girl \vho know 
how to keep a secret. 

Marguerite Priscilla Slate 

Musical fingers 4- dozens of radiant smiles =: 
a host of friends for Marguerite. 








*> 




A <f^iJ 





III ^pite i>f0iiini\'s professed Quakerism, she has 
a (Icciilril militaristic teiiilencv. 



Edith Irene Trivette 

\ true lilue girl who is the possessor of a lovels 
silver-toned voice. 



AIargari-t Annabel Warner 

Mar^i's enviable scholarship and participation in 

extra-curricular acti\ities permit her indulgence 

in games of "competition." 



Jessi-: Allen \Vhite 

'Preacher's" a genuinel> good sort, at that. 



AMI'S Har(ili) White 



It Mill uater run- deep, ho« we'd love to fatho 
the depth (]f this ipiiet pool ! 



Grace \Vinekin 

A petite 'ilemoiselle with black eyes, Idack liair, 
and a mind \er\ nun.h lier own. 



H. Sinclair \\'illiam,s 

ie loves more co-eds, and loves co-eds innre 
than ans otiur Httle boy on campus. 



DoRoTin' Alice Wolff 

Winning smiles and practical application of nat- 
ural endowments make Hot a general favorite. 



William Walik> AN'dod^' 

n hour has he spent in contemplation of 
the easie-t wa\ ! 



^he QuaJier, f7\jneteen '^hirty-oyie 



j£% 






Colors: Silver and Rose Flower: Rose 

Motto: Rowing, not li rifting. 

■r 

Fall Term Officers 

Harry Welloxs President 

Frances Carter I'iee-Pres'ulent 

Mary Linvii.i.E Seeretary 

i 

Spring Term Officers 

Melvin Lynn President 

Wendell Newlin I'iee-President 

Grace Bulla Seeretary 



fl^ 



>l. 



^he Qiia\er, J^neteen thirty-one 




Sophomore Class 



Flttcher Allen 



1-'k.\\k Allen- 



J/' « Sam I el Bass 



RIE BEACHU^r 



Mar\ Katherine Booker 



.Matthew BRincrR 

(jRACE Bl LLA 

M \R\ Edith Camp 



Robert Carroll 



Frances Carter , i ^ 



(A^; 






1 I GH Colil! 

SinNE\' Cobb 

AIar-^- Cannon 



^he Qua\er, U\(j^etEen 




Katharixk P\)rla\v 

Edward Fixison 

Vernon Fllk 



Simpson Garner 

Annie Gray 



Doris Hadlev 

Virginia Hiatt 

Sylvester Higgins 




^he Quaker, J\[ineteen 'thirty-one 



Sophomore Class 

Uth Ida Hiller 

Emii.\ Hixshaw 

LiLLiAx Holder 



RoxiE HUXTER 

William Hire 



Carl Joxes 

Claude Laxd 

Mary Lixville 



M.EL\IX Lvxx 

jj Gladys McBaxe 



Rlth Marshiurx 

Stewart Martix 

Llcille Meadows 



^fie Qiia\er, U\(jneteen thirty-one 



«•• 



Sophomore Class 

William Meadows 

Charles Milxer 

Odell Neal 



Elizabeth Newlin 

RosELAxn Xewlix 



Wendell NE\vi^c^-f/j_ ^ 



Nelson Pilch er 

AIarv Richardson 



Esther Roach 

Ava Roberts 

Doris Sapp 




f^X^ 




^he Quaker, J^neteen thirty-one 



V.v¥A.\s Shii;i,ds 

William Sixoletarv 

Ottie Slavtox 



Harlex Stoi't 

CURTISS SWAIiM 



/rni:L SwAiM 

Ai.iHxi-; Thomi'sox 

I\AX Tho.MI'SOX 



Cathlrixi: Tlrxhr 

^1 H\RR^ \\'i;i.Loxs 



Ua\ii) West 

AXXIE EVEL^X WiLEV 

Ddrotih Whitfield 



'^he Qua\cr, V\[ineteen thirty-one 



Am. 






Freshmriae Class 

Colors: Piirpk- anil Gold Fl'nvcr: Iris 

Miiito: Aim liiiili and climb Iii^Ikt. 

r 

Fall Term Officers 

Harold PlrnI'I.i Prcs'uhnt 

Rose Askhw I'hc-Frcs'ulcnt 

AIoZIU.LE Ti;.\GL"E Siirclary 

1 

Spring Term Officers 

Lhro\ Mieler Prisiiliitt 

Rl K\- Hoi, III R ]'i(,-Prisiilii:t 

Hl'A'R'S' Tl RXER Smrt/vy 



fV» 








Fr 


eslnman 


CI 


ass 






Lewis 


Eari.ine 




Rose 






Elbert 


Orin 


Abel 


Adams 




Askew 






AVCOCK 


A \ COCK 


Marie 


i',L\ NN" 




ROSCOE 






Mildred 


Rosa Lee 


Bali.ance 


Bane 




Barrou 






Beaslev 


Bell 


CiRADV 


Essie 




Marv 






Emma 


Marshall 


Bishop 


Brown 




Buchanan 




Buckner 


BUDD 


MU.DRKI) 


Alice 




\'IRCINIA 






\\'ILLL\M 


El WOOD 


Burton' 


Case 




Cavenaugh 




COPELAND 


Cox 




Xnni Hot 



Freshman Class 



Esther Lei-: 
Cox 

Ernest 
Dixos 

Marv 

Fitzgerald 

Maude 
Hollow ELL 



Gi.ENORA 

Crews 

Ralph 
Edwards 

Jack 

CjLISSON' 

Jack 
Hunt 



RUBVE 

Crews 

Nell 

Ellington' 

Marv 
Grimsley 

Thomas 

HOUCK 



Miriam 

CUDE 

Anna Belle 
Elliott 

Jennings 
Hill 

Sarah 
Jarrett 



George 
Denny 

Irene 
Everett 

Ruby 
Holder 

Clifton 
Johnson 



^he QiiaJier, Mjneteen thirty-one 








Freshman 


CI 


ass 




rY^^ 


/ 


Edna 


Marv 


Sarah 






Mar 1 HA 




\an Rav 


JOH\-SO\- 


Johnson 


Kearns 






Lane 




Lanier 


nil.MAN 


Tai.mage 


Therman 






David 




Emanuel 


Lawson 


Lewis 


Long 






Ll'tz 




Mallo 


Nkli. 


Lerov 


Ree;ce 






Eunice 




Ruby 


McMlllex 


Mn.LER 


Monroe 






Otwell 




Painter 


Julia 


Branti.kv 


Marcarei 






John 




Harold 


Parkkr 


Peacock 


Pecram 






Pratt 




Purnell 



^he Qua\er, V^j^^^^'^^ thirty-one 




Freshmae Class 



Marianna 


Horace 


Ernest 


Clyde 


David 


Raiford 


Raslev 


Reamer 


Redding 


Reynolds 


Nathan 


William 


CjRADY 


RODGl'RS 


Phyllis 


Reynolds 


Rogers 


Royal 


Rldd 


ScOTT 


Genevieve 


Bruce 


Samra 


Joseph 


Jessie 


Sheetz 


Smathers 


Smith 


Suiton 


Taylor 


MiLLICENT 


MOZELLE 


Oliver 


HOI.TON 


Russell 


Teacue 


Teague 


Thomas 


Thornburg 


TlPPETT 



^he Qua\er, J^net^en^^^irfj^one 







^-% 



A. 






n 



\'adf. 

\\'.\TSO\" 



Fresliimaii Class 



IIf:km.\\ 
Trivii [i; 

Frank 
Werstkk 

John IUgii 
Williams 



Clara Belle 
Welch 

Randolph 

WiNSLOVV 



Hlnrv 
Tlrner 

Ervvin 

^^'ERNER 

Norman 
Wyche 



Ralph 
Waller 

Martha Gray 
White 



60 



'"JSZSSST.-' 



r 


' ■') 


.■4 














^he QuaJ^Yy VXjneteen thirty-one 





in s /itiiiietic Calbmet 

James Bu.vk Praidenl 

II. Dii.i.AKi) C'MiSMoiM fui-l'iisiJent 

William Alley SfiirUiry 

JdiiN' Anderson Coiu/i 

F. Carlvle SiitPARD Facully Ad-v'tsor 

Stli)i:xt Maxagmrs 

Jesse Carson Foolball 

Adstin Garner Basclmil 

Carl Jones T,nms 

Morgan Raiford Track 

II. Sinclair Williams Bashilhail 



^he Qiia\er, Mjneteen thirty-one 




o 




'ilA.ll AMitl..>w., ,,.,., 


,,,, ,,,,,,, i..,,,,, ,„i> 


--'■a!-on than 


i.s imlicated by the scores 


A tough schedule cut dowi 


1 on victories. 


<-APTAIN UPPINCOTT 


■losed a hrilliant career as 


the "Masked 


Marvel" of the Quaker li 


ne fighting like a wildcat in 


every game. 


.101 IX LOVE starred in 


iiore than one Quaker vi.to 


y during the 


v.asuii and deserved the 


honor of captain for 1931. 




■l-<iM changed from quar 


er to halfback and became 


a terror for 


' i-nferenee opponents. A 


< a result he was elected on 


the All-Con- 


1. lence team. 






' \NN<:iN played every n 


linute of the season except 


the final five 


Ml llie A. C. C. game and 


was a star all the time he wa 


■i on the field. 




«♦ 



^he Quaker^ U\[jneteen 'thirty-one 




JACKSON" was a power in the Quak. 
of a broken leg late in the season, was 
guard. 

REECE upheld the tradition of the red-thatched clan by proving 
himself one of the most capable players in the Guilford line. 



HENDRIX is a mighty little man but th 
player done up in that small package. 



JIMMIE further distinguished himself as 
ford has claimed in quite a while. 

The high-light of a good season for TIP 
from the kick-oft against A. C. C. 



a lot of football 
he flashiest runner Guil- 
vas a ninety-yard gallop 




i^||||||^^^HpH|HpBHHII|| 


^^^l^^^^^m^ Ji^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 






40 


,^ "^^N^k '^^ ■ 



f> 



^he Qua}{er, J\[ineteen thirty-one 




^he QuaJicr, V\ineteen thirty-one 




BOI 1 






1 


I ] 


111 


11- a in 


-omi. i.f 


the mn<it 


l.nlliaii, 1 , 


I 1 ni ill ^ 


1 1) 


ill 


Kl u 


li\" 


a lUillfc 


rd line 


man dui 


ing thL "^eas 


on 
















REAMER w 


as a towel 


of St 


1 p 


ii,th 


111 t 


le Guilt 


jnl lin 


■ hnth ol 


offdlbt and 


on defense 
















HAWORTH 


was a mighty good 


end \ 


vhen 


he got 


a chance to play 


He was espc 


cially adept 


at pa 


ss- 


recei 


■ing. 








COBB was 


a star at f 


ullbai- 


c 


n se 


■eral 


games 


during 


the year 


He was a bt 


ar on defens 


e and 


Ire 


Dicked hi 


s holes E 


md wei 


t through 


on offense. 


















WEBSTER 


promises to 


lieeon 


le 


a real star in co 


ming ^ 


ears. He 


played brill 


antly at tin 


ics du 


rir 


g hi 


3 fre 


shman season. 




CARSON w 


as liiglily 1 


fUcien 


I 


n ha 


ndlii 


g the 


te;tm f 


s stud, nt 


manager. 


















PRA.NKIE 


distinguisli, , 


Irm 


elf as 


the 


li.-.'it ih 


eerl.-ad 


er in tin 


Noith State 


Confti.m , 




















^he Qiialier, Mjneteen thirty-one 




Football Sqiuiad 



♦;% 



From the first of tht- season right through to the very last tlie 
(Jiiaker football sijiiad was the strongest that has e\er remained out 
all (luring a cam|iaigii. Se\eral of the men might ha\e had a chance 
to pla\ more had there not been so many pla\ers on hand. 

It was su|ierfluous talejit that troubled Anderson, for forty men are 
too man\' for one man to watch o\er carefull\. This has been cited as 
one of the main contributing factors in the indifferent success of the 
team. 

It is the unsung forces of the reserves that deser\e much of the 
credit for the success which the team did enjo\-. These men who stay 
out all year and act as cannon fodder for the perfection of a smooth 
machine are making a great contribution to the ultimate success of their 
team. 

()ther than the lettermen the t<ilIowing pla\ers deserve great ad- 
miration for their consistent work through tlie whole season: ^Vinslow, 
Monroe, and Denny, ends; Hlair ,uul Pierce, tackles; Thomas and 
Beaman, guards; Johnson, center; and [.iit/. Miller, Piirnell, and 
Williams, hacks. 

No one slioulil get the false impression that these men were out in 
the role of cheeiful maityrs. Exeryonc of them was fighting like a 
demon for a p<isition and several of them will see this realized before 
the end of their career. 



6S 



^he Quaker, U\(jineteen thirty-one 



Th(e Footlball Season 

The Quakers faced one of the toughest football schedules ever played by a local 
eleven this year but from this list of tough opponents they were able to secure an even 
break in games won and lost. 

The opening game with Emory and Heiny was the first college football for sev- 
eral of the (juilford players and this crack bunch of Virginia \eterans scored a 27-0 
victory. 

^Villianl and Alary came next on the schedule and this team also added a victory 
for the Old Doniiinon by the count of 24-0. 

The following Saturday the Quakers invaded the den of tiu- highly tooted Deacons 
and held the near-conquerors of Carolina to a 20-0 score. 

The next encounter was with another Virginia eleven and this time the locals man- 
aged to secure an even break with Randolph-Macon as both teams failed to score. 

The Naval Apprentice School, still another V^irginia institution, proved the first 
victim. The initial (Juaker victory was won, 14-6, in a night game at Newport News. 

And then came the massacre, (niilford met Atlantic Christian College in their 
first Conference game at the Alemorial Stadium and handed the Little Christians an 
awful drubbing, bg-o. 

The following week-end Elon rallied in the last half to beat the local eleven in a 
game which resembled the one between the two schools last year, the fortunes being 
reversed on this occasion to the tune of 12-g. 

To win back the confidence of her followers, however, (niilford beat the Lenoir 
Rhyne team 25-0 at Hickory in another night game. 

The glory of this victory was short lived, however, as the Catawba Indians, under 
the direction of Charlie Moran, beat the Quakers in a mud battle at the stadium 
18-0. 

To regain the confidence of her backers once more, the Quakers top|ied off the 
season with a brilliant victory over Lynchburg College, of Virginia, here on Hobb's 
Field, 39-0. 

Two uiteresting things were true in connection with the season. In the first place 
six of the games were played at night, the first that Guilford had ever played after 
dark, and secondly, five of the teams on the schedide are Virginia institutions. 

Schedule for 1931 

Sept. 19— Emory and Henry E„^o,,._ Virginia 

Sept. 26— Wdham and Mary AVilliamsburg, Virginia 

Oct. 3— Randolph-Macon Petersburg, Virginia 

Oct. R>-Roanoke S_.,,^„,_ Virginia 

Oct. 16— Naval Apprentice School Newport News Virginia 

Oct. 24-High Point C^^^.ilj^^j 

Oct. 31-Lynchburg Lynchburg, Virginia 

Nov. 7-Lenoir Rhyne Guilford 

Nov. .4-Langley Field Langley Field, Virginia 

Nov. 2. -Elon Greensboro 




fl^f 



69 



^he Qiialier, J^neteen thirty-one 




Basketball 

The season just closed was one of the hest in recent years tor the Quaker quint. 
After a poor start the ( iuilfonl fi\e hit a fast stride near niiil-season that pla\eil havoc 
with more than one anihitious opponent. 

Numbered among the late season victims was Davidson at the time when the 
Wildcats were leading the Big Fi\e race; Catawba also took a tumble from the peak 
of the Xorth State Conference heap when they dropped a contest to Guilford on the 
local Hoor, .Although the (Juakers were hehuul Catawba and Appalachian in the 
final standing, the hiCaK won more conterence games than an\ other North State Con- 
ference team. 

The fi\e-man combination of Ca|itain .\lle\ and Haworth, forwards, jamieson, 
center, and Chish. Im and Cheek, guards, jilayei! the greater |iait of the time. The 
first two led the scoring tor the \ear and Haworth pla\ed brilliantly on the floor. 
He has been elected captain tor the coming year. 

l)oh Janueson was ,i beautitul Hocu' worker and his defensive tactics were out- 
standing in several games. Cheek and Chisholm formed a powerfid guarding com- 
bination that made it h.iril foi' (jpponents to score. 

Cobb, W'ildman. and Purnell were other men wIkj plaved in a number of games 
and who gained letters tor their service. Milner and Royal did some good work but 
did not have (;pportunit\ to play in enough of the contests to earn a letter. 



^he QnaJicr, VXinetecn thirty-one 




i-t^Jdr^X''. 



^r^ 




j£% 







•v> 






Basketball Lettp^y*'^' 



^he QiiaJier, Mjneteen thirty-one 




K^ 



aseball lor 1930 



The Quaker nine of the p;ist season did not come up to advance notices and in 
most ways the season was one of doubtful success. 

The se\en lettermen in camp sounded like mcjie strenstii than they ever exhibited 
and the additions to the team during' the season ]iro\ed better fielders than hitters. 

Prospects for the team this sjiring seem iiood fVu'. in addition to the ten veterans 
who are returning:, there are several bo\s who came to ( luilford with \aluable ex- 
perience in baseball. 

Captain Zachary, the team's leadiiig hitter iar the past season, heads the list of 
lettermen and this also includes I. Davis, Cheek, Hunn, Chisholm, Hendrix, C. Davis, 
Shore, Jamieson, and (chnsoii. 




^he Qiialier, UXjneteen thirty-one 




Track for 

Under the direction of Professor Carlyle Sliepard there was a revi\al of interest 
in track here last sprina:. In spite of the rather unsuccessful showing in the per- 
centage cohniins, the enthusiastic response which it received from the students lends 
great promise for the future. 

Newlin, Wellons, and Allen are new men who made letters last season and who 
are back again this year. In addition there are Captain John Phillips, Alley, Ha- 
worth, and Harper, veterans from other years, will form a nucleus for another suc- 
cessful season. 

An effort is being made to ha\e the Xorth State Conference meet here. A great 
deal of work is being do^ne in improving the track with this in view, and whether 
this comes through or not there will he an added interest from the local candidates. 




^♦\ <>y 



.L 




^ 



V 



♦;» 



"She QiialvCT, Jiineieen 'BTiirty-one 



R 1 jl 



^ f^ 







Tlirei' (if rlic li'ttt-riiH-]! tnini last vtMi's ti-iini> tt'ani 
arc not back so thi- success of tlu- (Jiiakcr nctincn for the 
coming season will depend laruely u|ion tlie efforts of a 
green hunch. 

Captain ]>ra\ton and Parsons are the veterans who 
are back and the\ ha\c exhibited hue torni in earl\ wcnk- 
outs. 

Manager Jones has niaiiped out an ambitious sched- 
ule for the team and there is also some agitation in fa\or 
of inxiting the teams of the North, State Conference to 
hold their annual meet here this spring. 



»» 



^he Q^iaJier, 'iNjneteen thirty-one 




Lettermee 



John' Lipimncott 
Thomas Cheek 
HowARu Cannon 
WELnON Reece 
Ivan Jackson 



John Phillips 
Wujjam Alley 



Granvh.le Alley 
Thomas Cheek 



Charlie Zachary 
Thovlas Cheek 
James Bunn 



FoOTBAI.I, 

John Love 
Dewey Hendrlx 
James Bunn 

Hu 1 ARIl ClIISIlol 

R\i 



S\MLEL Bass 
Harry Wellons 
Dennis Johnson 
Claiiie Lani) 



Fari.ow 
Track. 

JAMKS HARPEK 

Elvin Haworth 
Frank Allen 



Ernest Reamer 
Elvin Haworth 
Hugh Cobb 
Frank Webster 
RoRERi Jamieson 

\\'eni)Ell Nevvlik 
Harry Wellons 



H ASKrxi! Al.L 
Elvin Hauokhi Dn lard Chishoi m 

RoBER'i Jamieson llunii Cobb 

Baseball 
Dewey Hendrix Ikvin Davis 

DiLi.ARD Chisholm Clieiori) Shore 



Tennis 



Wii.BERT Braxton 



David Parsons 



Sl'dRTS Maxaghrs 

Jesse Carson FonlhaH Morgan Raieord 

Sinclair Williams Baskrilnill Carl Junes . 



Robert Wildman 
Harold Purnell 



Robert Jamieson 
Clarence Davis 
Dennis Johnson 



. Track 
. Tiiinis 



*;♦ 




^he QuaJier, J^neteeii thirty-one 



jee s 



♦It 



Although a successful athletic team is much to he cherished, it is the primary 
ohject of the (iuilford plnsical educaticn |irograni to <ii\e ever\ ho\- a chance 
to develop idiysically as well as mentalK diiruig his stay here. 

The maint.-nance of fu e inter-collegiate athletic squads offers ample oppor- 
tunitx for e\er\ bo\ to find >ome sport for which he is litted. The foctball squad 
maintains an average of around forty men during the season; lifteen men 
usually remain out for basketball; baseball attracts a squad of thirty men; track 
a similar number; and tennis takes u]i the time of a dozen or more. 

For those who do not wish to make a bid for a varsity team there are reg- 
ularly sujierv ised mter-class games which |irovide plenty of exciting competition. 

Naturally, there are some boys who make outstanding records as athletes. 
There are four three-letter men in school, Chisholm, Cheek, Jamieson, and Ha- 
worth. Several of the boys develop to the extent that they gain outside recog- 
nition as in the case of Jackson and Cheek in football when they were selected 
on all-Conference teams, Haworth, selected on the all-Conference basketball 
team, and Zacharv, who has become one ot the mosft talked of college baseball 
jdavers in the state. 

There has been a conscious effort made here to avoid over-emphasis on ath- 
letics and the |ir<]minent place which (iudford has gained among the small col- 
leges of the state has come from willing, co-operative Avork, from a group of 
bo\s who have had as their |iiimarv objective a college education. 

Inder the linancial direction of Pidfessdi- Carlvle Shepard the athletic as- 
sociation is gradiiallv freemg itself from debt and at the same time is building 
up the phvsical equipment of the athletic teams. 

Coach Anderson, in his secoiul year at (luilford, has been successful with 
his teams, the tootball season being somewh.at over-shadowed by the brilliant 
work ot the basketball plavers the latter p.irt ot the season. 

Coach Anderson is also at the head of the efforts to create an interest among 
the whole student bodv in athletics and he has two experienceil helix-rs to aid 
with the non-varsity work. 

In addition. Professor I'ancoast and Professor Fiirn.is hel]! the pl.ivers with 
their tennis game, while Profess(U- Shepard spends ,i great de.al of his spare 
time in organizing and working with tlie track squad. 



76 



^he Quaker, V^neteen thirty-one 




Esther Li.vdley 

Edna Wafford . . . 
Eleanor Bancs 



Sports Man'.agi^rs 

JtA.V COCKRAN iiiy,„^ 

Alice Conrad . . . 7-^,„„,-^ 

Leon-a Guthrie liaskrlhall 

Louise Melville rulhy Hall 

Mary Reynolds .... Ilnckiv 

LoiTiE Si afford Dc.s,ball 

Ethel Shaim .... y-^.^i /. 

Margaret Warner Ilralili 

Dorothy Wolff .;,.,/,, 



fll> 




Mrs. Andrews 



A^L 




"^ 



y. 



K> 



^he QitaJier, J\[jneteen thirty-one 




llnuKI-Y CH \.MI' 




\'()l,l,l \ HALL CH AMI'S 



^he Qiia\er, VSjneteen thirty-one 



« 




j£% 






U 



.\ii).\(k;ka.\i CIA li 




fV> 



MAY 1:>.AV FESTIVAL 




^he Qua}{er, J^neteen thirty-one 



♦i* 



Womee's Athletics 



1 lu' athlftics nf tlu- (Juakt'r maidens bi'giii with thi- Dpeinng of school and continue, 
three times a week, throvitihout the year. I-'hxsical education is a required course, but 
a \ariet\ ot sports are offered to hoKl the interest ot the groups. The Women's 
Athletic Association, comjioseil of students and advised by Mrs. H. M. B. Andrews, 
arranges interclass games and tournaments which re|ilace the usual intercollegiate sports. 

1 he wide open spaces attract in the early autimin, and most of the work is done on 
the athletic field. Hockey has been a major sport tor several years and soccer was 
recently introduced for the upper classmen. V^olle\ ball, in the gymnasium, is sched- 
uled regularh, and intensive work shapes new material and polishes up the old, pro- 
ducing tour crack teams which offer keen competition. Peature games, in which the 
laculty or a squad of Quaker males indulge, offer some di\ersit\ in this department. 

Paddle tennis — indoor tennis "gone miniature" — is another addition to this year's 
curriculum. Small courts are marked off in the g\ ni, anil regular tennis rules are 
followed in the miniature style. Doubles or singles might be played and interest in 
gym classes, during the period de\oted to paddle tennis, took a noticeable leap. 

Routine gymnastic work is developed during the late winter and early spring. 
Stunts, drill work, aesthetic and folk dancing are the regular parts of the curriculum. 
The stunts incliule apparatus work and novelty exercises, while the drilling is mainly 
tor the development of muscle co-ordination. The annual gym meet features this 
type ot work, including marching and class group stimts. 

The .Mav festival follows closely on the gym exhibition, and the dancers attempt 
to carrv out the idea of the awakening of Spring. The festival presents a charming 
.scene staged against the naturally beautiful background of the campus. To this gala 
occasion, the public is invited. 

Baseball concludes the scheduled work, but the Athletic Board has worked out a 
point system tor the opportui.itv of additional physical development and honor awards, 
numerals, stars, monograms, and loving cups are given for points. Among some of the 
sports in which one can earn extra points are hiking, health habits, tennis, basketball, 
and archerv. 

Through conscientious endeavrir the I'hvsical F'ducation I)e|iartment has made 
broad advancements ot which the college may well be proud. 




sf iiii 



ORGANIZATIONS 



-,i i^ 



■;-^^ 



^-^'/p: 



^he QuaJierf UXineteen thirty-one 




Stwdemt Affairs Board 

George Allen Pnsidrni 

DOROTHV Wolff I'icc-PiesiJcnt 

Eleanor Bangs Si-cretary 

Represextatives 
Frank Allen Alice Conrad Marvin Lindlev Lotiie Stafford 

Granville Alley Eugene Eagle David Parsons Imogene Stricklanp 

William Alley James Harper Glenn Robertson Katie Stuckev 

John Hugh Williams 

Faculty Advisors 
Dorothy L. Ciu.BERT V,v..\ Lasi.ki E. Garness Purhom J. Pali. Reynolds 

Since its tarmation i[i 192S, the Stiulent Affairs Board has maiie rapid advancement in po- 
sition and importance until it is now one of the most progressive organizations on the campus. 
It is composed of representatives from every student organization, each selected bv the group 
which he represents, and the four faculty members, appointed by the President of the college, 
lend the calm wisdom of experience and superior intellect to the decisions of the Board. 

One of the ne\vly-ac(|uired duties of the Hoard is the supervising of the financial s\ stem of 
the organizations participating in the student fee. The budget system, being an experiment the 
first year, has passed a highly successful and satisfactory term, and will continue to function for 
the year 1931-32 by the vote of three-fourths majority of the student bodv. 

Another important function of the Board is the manipulation of the general campus elec- 
tion which takes place every Spring. At this election every student is given the opportunity to 
cast his ballot for the officers of the Christian Associations, and .Athletic -Associations, and the 
Student Government Associations. The addition of superlatives to the ballot lends jollity and 
zest to an otherwise serious occasion. 

83 



fX» 



^he QiiaJier, J\!j.neteen thirty-one 




♦i* 



Womsiti's Studeet Government Council 

Lkona Clthkie President 

Kaiii: Silckkv I'iu-l'ii-s'utint 

CiRAci: Hassei.l Siiiclary 

Llcv Edwards Treasurer 

Argvi.k Elliott FaunJers Ilniise President 

EsTliKR LiNDLHV A'cif Cardeti llcntse President 

Reprhsextatives 

Edna Wafford, '31 
Bfra Brown, '3. '"^^ '^'^'"^ ^''■'^^'^"' ''' Francfs Cartfr, '33 

MaRCKRI ] WaRNHR, '32 \1K(;INL\ lIlAlT, '33 

Nkll McMlii.lfn, 3+ 
Martha Lane, '3+ 



•31 



84 



^he Qua\er, VXjneteen thirty-one 




Men's Student Government Council 

Thomas J. Cheek Pn-siclrnl 

I"*"'^ "^^^'S rur-f'nsUf„l 

James Bunn S.aelary 

Class Represextatives 

James Blnx, '31 Waoe Makie, '32 

iRvi.v Davis, '31 Simpson- Garner, '33 

John Love, '32 David Parsons, '33 

Thomas Houck, '34 

Spriiiij R,prisc7itali-vcs 

Brantlev Peacock, '34 
John Hugh Williams, '34 



8S 



"^fie QiiaJier, J^neteen thirty-one 




Tlhe Young Woniien's Cliristian Association 

Louise Mhlvu.i.f. Prcs'uUnt 

Makv RhiNOi.iis J'icf-PrcsiJint 

Marcuhrite Si.ATE Si'cri'lary 

Leona Guthrie Ticasur,r 

Cabinet 

Alice Coxrau Social 

Jli.ia Plummer Seri'iee 

CiKACE Hassei.i RiHr/liiiis Meetings 

Isabella Jinvkite Ili/ilr SluJy 

\'IRC;IMA IIlAII Jl'iiild I'lllowship 

Marv Reynolds Mcmhersliip 

Frances Carter Publicily 

Arcvle Elliott Music 

Jkan Cochran' I nj, i uiiuUtali R, pi rsenliilivc 



^he QuaJier, U\(jneteen thirty-one 




Tlie Youeg 



BuNVAN' Andrew Prcsuimi 

WiLBERT Braxtok Vta-Pri'sidint 

Paul Tew Seciilary-Trensurer 

Cabinet 

Morgan- Raiforu Riliyious M,-il'ui(/s 

Harry Wellons Bible SluJy 

David Parsons Mission Study 

George Allen Membership 

Ralto Farlow New Student 

Glenn Robertson Social 

Marvin Lindley Music 

Carl Jones Publicity 



^he QiiaJier, J\[ineteen thirty-one 




The Music Departeiemt 



This \far the (luilfoiil musical (Ifpartmciit has come to the trout as one of 
the stronuest |ihases of coUeire work. This has been true not only in connec- 
tion with those features that tall iiniler the head of extra-curricular activities 
but also with reference to the uurk ot the department itself. 

Miss (iail A\'ilhur assumed her duties as head of public school music in the 
fall and the pojiularity of this course is expected to prove a source of attraction 
for incominj^ students in future years. With Miss Wilbur looking after this 
work Professor Xoah was free to de\(ite more time to the development of his 
orfzanizations and to teach voice. 

Two of the students, ( ie(M jzia Fidk, pianist, and (ilenn Robertson, \ocalist, 
plan to jii\e tiraduating recitals in the spring. Hoth have been ver\ prominent 
in .ill musical organizations since they came to (luilford. 

\\'itli Horace Rrown, student \iolinist, acting as director, a modest begin- 
ning has been made towaid the de\elo|inient (if a college orchestra. This work 
has been handicapped by lack of material but it is hoped that through this, a 
new type of music student may be appealed to. 

The work ot the Community Choral society in the fall showed marked im- 
pro\ement over that of preceding \ears .and the .innual Messiah concert presented 
at Christmas time was .icclaimed the best e\er offered here. 

It is, however, the woik ot the A Capell.i choir that has won the greatest 
recognition. A greater student mterest h,is been shown in this organization dur- 



^he Quaker, ^7\jneteen thirty-one 




A CAPEI.I.A CHOIR 



iiig the present season. This is partial!}' due to the promise of a tri|i north 
during the spring vacation. Tlie requirement of qualification for the choir has 
been raised and the standard sliould be elevated even higher than the degree 
of perfection attained last spring when the local singers won worthy recogni- 
tion from over the entire state. 

The choir is in its first year as a regular sclieduled class and the total of five 
practices each week, not to mention the indi\idual training which each jierson is 
to receive, seems to insure the success of the group for this year. 

In addition to the proposed northern trip, arrangements have been made to 
present a concert at the Odell Memorial building, in Greensboro, the concert 
to be sponsored by the members of the Lions Club of the city. Other leading 
towns in the state will be visited, as the management seeks to spread the fame of 
the Guilford Choir over North Carolina. 

The loss of Nettie Rayle as brilliant soprano soloist this year is far from a 
death-dealing blow as Jewell Conrad, her promising successor, possesses the na- 
tive ability to do quite as well with this work. 

By far the most cheering thing which has happened in connection with the 
group this year was the visit of Dr. John Finlay Williamson, director of the 
famous Westminster Choir. He directed the choir through three of their num- 
bers and was enthusiastic in his praise of the work that is being done at Guil- 
ford. He congratulated the members upon the degree of perfection which has 
been achieved and pointed out to them their splendid opportuiuty to popularize 
music of this nature in the South. 



*> 




^he Quaker, J\[ineteen 'thirty-one 



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Dramatic Couincil 

Phii.ip Furn'AS, Director 



D.win Parsons 
DoRnxnv Wolff 

ChARLHS MllAER 

Lucii.LK Paitfrson- 
Edward Bi.air 



David Parsons 
RosH Askew 
Howard Caxxok 



Play Casts 

Fall 

"It Won't Be Long Now" 

LiNwooD Bfamax 
Sarah Davis 

ROSEFAND NEWI.IX 

Henrv Tlrxer 
BuwAx Andrew's 
Herman" Trivftte 

Spring 

"Outward Bound" 

Laura Conrad 
Jesse Carson- 
Esther Lee Cox 



AlSFIN (iARNER 

Rachel Beasley 
Aliene Thompson 
Wmjja.m Rodgers 
Ernest Ofxon 



Matthew Bridger 
Erwin Werner 
Morgan Raiford 



^he Qua}{er, U\(ineteen thirty-one 




Members of the debating squad tor 1931 will discuss the question 
selected by the Pi Kappa Delta, national forensic fraternity, "Resolved, 
that the nations should adopt a policy of Free Trade." Being the ques- 
tion of tariff, that stimulator of oratory in the legislati\e bodies of the 
nations, it is fitting that the college debaters of the United States should 
discuss this world-wide issue. 

Guilford will enter the field of verbal combat in the annual trian- 
gular debate with High Point and Lenoir Rhyne, a dual with Elon, and 
a single with Appalachian. 

Kdward Hlair, Ralto Farlow, Wade Mackie, ^Vilbert l^axton, 
Allen White, Leroy Miller, Jr., William Copeland, and Albert Weston 
are Guilford's pro.spective debaters. I?lair is the only man of experience, 
although Farlow was an alternate last year. The squad finds capable 
and willing assistance in Dr. Perisho, Dr. McCracken and Dean Milner. 



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^he Quaker, Mjneteen 'thirty-one 



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Quaker Board 

Jamfs M. Hari'I r Edilor-in-C.liiif 

V\'ii.bi:rt Braxton- . Maiiaiiini/ lulilor 

Eleanor c:. Bancs IskkuiIi EJiloi 

Eleanor Grimslev /// l-.Jilur 

Frances Carter ... .Isuslanl .lil Edilar 

Irvin Pavis Rusincss Manager 

Edward Blair hsislanl Business Manager 



^he QuaJier, V\ineteen thirty-one 




(Guilfordian Board 

Ernest Scarboro EJilor-in-C/iief 

DOROTHV Wolff Manaijinii tJilor 

Wade Mackie Business Manayti 

Faculty Advisors 
N. Era Lasi.ev Philip W. Furnas 

Dorothy L. Gilbert Uuan'e McCracken 



^he QuaJier, J\(ineteen thirty-one 




Philainathean LiterarA^ Society 



RuBv Lee Anderson- 
Rose Askew- 
Marie Ballance 
Glynn Bane 
Marie Beachom 
Mildred Beaslev 
Rachel Beaslev 
Bera Brown 
Essie Brown 
Grace Bulla 
Mary Edith Camp 
Eleanor Carson 
Virginia Clayton 
Alice Conrad 
Jewell Conrad 
Laura Conrad 
Mildred Conrad 
Edith Cooke 
Esther Lee Cox 



Roll 



Rup.^ e Crews 
Katherine Forlavv 
Mary Fitzgerald 
(Seorcia Fulk 
Edna Guthrie 
Leona Guthrie 
Doris Hadley 
Lillian Holder 
Ruby Holder 
\l\ude hollowixl 
Edna Johnson 
Sarah Kearns 
Josephine Kimrey 
Pearle Kimrey 
Ollie McBane 
Elma McCanlkss 
Maitie McCanless 
Louise Melville 
Elizabeth Newlin 
Eunice Oiwell 



Jllia Parker 
Lucille Patterson 
Julia Plummer 
Marianna Raiford 
NL\RY Reynolds 
Mary Richardson- 
Esther Roach 
Phyllis Scott 
Genevieve Sheetz 
Merlie Sizemore 
Marguerite Slate 
Katie Stuckey 
Ethel Swaim 
Rebecca Taylor 
Edna Wafford 
Margaret Warner 
NLxRTHA Gray White 
Dorothy Whitfield 
Grace Winekin 



» 



^he QuaJier, V\(jneteen thirty-one 



^* 




Earlinf. Adams 
Verna Andrew 
Marv K. Booker 
Mary Richardson 
Emma Buckner 
Olive Bumgarner 
Mildred Burton 
Frances Carter 
Sophia Cathev 
Ada Ann Clinard 
Ida Belle Cunard 
Louise Cooper 
Edith Cullipher 
Sarah Davis 
Elizabeth Edcerton 
I.icv Edwards 



ciety 



r;» 



Roll 

Argvle Elliott 
Anna Belle Elliott 
Eleanor (Srimslev 
Ri'iH Ida Hili.er 
Ci'krirudk HiNsiiAw 
Mabel Holton 
RoxiE Hunter 
Sarah Jarrett 
Isabella Jinnette 
Marv Johnson 
Martha Lane 
Maude Lineberry 
Esther Lindlev 
Marv Linvili.e 
Nell McMuli.en 
Gladys McBane 
Elizabeth McVey 



Elizabeth Parker 
AlLEEN Pecg 
CiRACE RanSDELL 

AvA Roberts 
Doris Sapp 
Blanche Silver 
Evelyn Shields 
Ottie Slavton 
Lottie Stafford 
Jessie Taylor 
Mozelle Teacue 
Aliene Thompson 
Edith Triveite 
Clara Belle Welch 
Annie Evelyn Wiley 
Dorothy Wolff 



.L 






^he Quaker, J\[jneteen thirty-one 




♦z% 



Henrv Clav Literarv Societv 



Elbert Aycock 
Oris Avcock 

C.ILBKRT BaRBEE 

RoscoE Barrow 
LiNWOOD Beaman 
Edward Blair 
Sam Boose 

WlLBERT L. BrAXTOV 

Marshall Budd 
Robert Carroll 

WlLLLWl COPELANT) 

Elwooi) Cox 
Er.vest Dlxon, Jr. 
Eucen'e Eagle 
Ralph Edward 
Ralto Farlow 
Austin' Garner 



Roll 

Simpson CJarner 
James Harper 
Vernon Fulk 
\^'iLLiAM Hire 
Thomas Houck 
Carl Jones 
Van Lanier 
DlI.MAX Lawson 
Talmadge Lewis 
Wade Mackie 
Stewart Mariin 
Ouei.l Nkal 

ROSELAND NEWLIN 

Wendell Newlin 
David Reynolds 
Nathan Reynolds 
Morgan Raiford 



\\'ILLIAM SlNGLETARY 

Holland Shields 
Clifford Shore 
Allen Stafford 
Harlan Stout 
Curtis Swaim 
Massey Tonge 
Henry Turner 
Ralph Waller 
Harry Wellons 
Allen White 
Harold White 
Robert Wildman 
H. S. Williams, Jr. 
John Williams 
Randolph Winslow 
Waldo Woody 



,'1V?^?!S?-SS^S^£SSSSSffJ 




FEATURES 


TJ^r^w-. 



m 



LUCY FINCH 

STUDENTGOVERNMENT 

SPONSOR. 



MARTHA AKMFIELD 
QUAKER. SPONSOR. 




BERA BROWN 
MEN'S ATHLETIC ASS'N 

CH05EH BY THE SECRETARY 



HELL MCMULLEN 
TKACIC 5PON50R3 




1 ^.A^As*?\* ■Xv!'^. v^ v^ 




ESTHER. LINDLEY 
FOOTBALL SQUAD 

CHOSEM By HARRY WELLONS 



DOR.OTHY WOLFF 
GUILFOR.DIAN SPONSOR. 

CHOSEN 5Y spotters EDITOR. 




HELEN BANKS 
HENRY CLAYLITERARY SOCIETY 






k 



ALIENE THOMPSON 
BASKETBALL5PONSOR. 




EMMA BUCKNEFo 

SPONSOR. STUDENT 

AFFAIR.S BOAR-D 




ANNIE RAY 
BASE ™ BALL SPONSOR. 



^he Qiial(er, Mjneteen 'thirty-one 




♦;♦ 



For more than twelve years Laura, Lizzie, and ^Ves have been employed at the 
college and tor twelve years the\ ha\e eaten Guilford food — the same diet ot the stu- 
dents who take their meals in Founders hall. When they came here not one of these 
darkies was of more than normal weight. Laiu'a was able to boast of a mere 140 
pounds, Lizzie 130. while Wes, being a man and better able to shift for himself, had 
accumulated 175 u|ion his frame. 

Twelve years have passed and each of these colored workers has prospered. Laura, 
chief of culinary affairs, seems to have prospered under local conditions more than any 
of the others for she is now able to balance the beam at 276, no mean feat in itself. 
This, to be statistical, means that in the course of a dozen years she has more than 
doubled her weight. ALiy point one be chalked up in favor of Gvu'lford grub! 

There seems to be no satisfactory explanation as to ju>t why Liz/ie. the other 
keeper of the kitchen, has been able to add but go pounds to her original tigure of 130. 
It's true, of cour.se, that no one should feel conspicuoush skinin with 22i> pounds 
adorning her chassis and Lizzie is satisfied. 

There is, on the other hand, a good reason f(jr the fact that Wes has been able to 
increase his weight no further than the 23(1 pound mark. For one thing, Wes is a fire- 
man and his duties in\(il\e a number fif things conducive to perspiration which is, of 
course, a dangerous enemy to ponderous physiques. Then, too, \\'es is not a tee- 
totaler. Two meals each day he eats at the college but the third is from his own 
kitchen and therein ma\' lie the real reason for his somewhat disajipointing de\elop- 
nient untier (iuiltord dietitians. 



^he QiiaJier, V\ineteen thirty-one 



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